Steltix Top Ten Tips for a successful Rollout

Steltix Top Ten Tips for a successful Rollout

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Unlike other ERP systems, EnterpriseOne is packaged as a fully integrated solution, with all of the modules of JD Edwards. Each module is priced separately, allowing the customer to only purchase licenses for the areas that form part of their requirement. EnterpriseOne was also the first ERP system to offer Mobile solutions and applications, with over 50 now available for Apple and Android.
EnterpriseOne is also multi-language
and multi-currency making it an ideal
ERP system for a global roll out. Steltix,
an Oracle Platinum Partner, has a vast experience as the leading JD Edwards implementor in Europe, rolling out EnterpriseOne to a wide range of customer organisations and industries, across multiple continents, languages and currencies.
Here are our top ten tips for a successful JD Edwards EnterpriseOne roll out:
 

1. Choose your project team carefully.

2. Produce a common coding guide which details standards for all aspects of the JD Edwards setup

3. Ensure consistency of configuration across countries/companies.

4. Ensure you have a clear training strategy in place.

5. Adopt a consistent change management approach.

6. Minimise the user login and administration and management functions.

7. At the start of the project, define a common chart of accounts that can
be centrally managed.

8. JD Edwards Security.

9. Understand the culture in the country/ area that you are rolling out to.

10. Project management.

 

1. Choose your project team carefully.

It is important that business process owners are assigned within the customer organisation. These people will be key to the success of the implementation. They must be knowledgeable and empowered and willing to change the current way
of doing things to a more streamlined, efficient and standardised way. They
must be engaged from the start of the project and empowered to make decisions appropriately. They will be the focus point to the rest of the client team.

2. Produce a common coding guide which details standards for all aspects of the JD Edwards setup, such as queue names, package names, folder structures etc.


This will ensure a consistent approach to the project across the various stages and roll outs. It will also ensure a consistent approach for managing data and the transition from one phase of the project to the next.
All team members must be fully conversant with the common coding guide and encouraged to adhere to it at all times.
 

3. Ensure consistency of configuration across countries/companies.

When rolling out to multiple companies and countries it is vital that the system is set up in such
a way that consistency and integrity is maintained. As well as a common coding guide, one of the key areas is EnterpriseOne versions. A completely new set of versions will be required for each country as the rollout progresses.
Creating these new versions is a time consuming and repetitive task. If you undertake this task by hand it is highly likely that errors will occur due to the repetitive nature of the work, which may require several days to complete.

This type of error may consume significant time in diagnosis and correction. Consider the use of a tool that can automate the copying and creation of the required new versions and allow functions like compare, find and replace, backup and restore functionality. This will dramatically reduce the time required for the rollout and also greatly reduce the chances of errors.
 

4. Ensure you have a clear training strategy in place.

Each phase of the roll out will introduce new users to the system. It is important that these users are fully trained and familiar with the new system before go live. This will minimise the number of service desk calls logged following go live that are not errors, but down to lack of user knowledge. Oracle UPK (User Productivity Toolkit) is a training tool designed to work closely with EnterpriseOne. It greatly speeds up the time required to produce training materials such as manuals, quick reference guides and slides. It also offers unique features such as being able to offer a video type view, known as “see it” mode, whereby the user can sit back and watch the given process. It offers the ability to test the user’s knowledge and the content can be linked to the help key within EnterpriseOne, allowing the help pages to use customer screens instead of standard ones.
Often, a ‘train the trainer’ approach works well whereby the consultant experts train the business process leads who then re-deliver the training to the end users.

5. Adopt a consistent change management approach.

This will ensure that the
full impact of each and every change,
no matter how small or large, is fully understood and is efficiently managed throughout the rollout process by both the customer team members and consultants. Deploying changes must be managed and a schedule produced for the building and deploying of packages, whereby the project team note any OMW packages requiring promotion using a formal log, prior to package builds and deployments. This will ensure a structured approach to change management and reduce the number of ad hoc package builds requested.

6. Minimise the user login and administration and management functions.

Following on from the above point, each new JDE user will require a JDE account and password. Removing the requirement for this additional logon to the system
can be achieved by the use of a tool that transparently logs the user into JD Edwards EnterpriseOne, using the pre-entered Windows Active Directory credentials. This will simplify the process of logging on and reduce the requirement for password resets within JDE. Consider the use of a transparent logon tool whereby the logging into EnterpriseOne is transparent to the user.

7. At the start of the project, define a common chart of accounts that can
be centrally managed.

Ensure this encompasses all aspects of the business and constituent countries and companies. This will facilitate the project rollout and prevent any local variations causing conflict with the defined core model.

8. JD Edwards Security.

The most secure way of rolling out a new system is to adopt a ‘closed doors’ security policy.
This will require a detailed knowledge
of the application functionality and all
the associated security features. Whilst EnterpriseOne offers a very comprehensive range of security features, both at the application and database level, this can be a complex and time consuming exercise, particularly where additional requirements exist, such as segregation of duties. In order to simplify this process there are a number of security products available which simplify the process and reduce the chances of holes being left within the security implementation.
Using such a product can reduce the time required to set the system up and reduce the likelihood of further enhancements being required.
 

9. Understand the culture in the country/ area that you are rolling out to.

Every country is different and each has its own culture. It is important that you understand the culture of the country and place you are rolling out to, as this needs to be taken into consideration when planning the rollout both in terms of the required skills and timings. Localisations are the JD Edwards term for the specific functionality for a given country that enables the country specific legal requirements, typically within finance and reporting. Oracle provides a wide range of localisations which can be applied to EnterpriseOne. However, these aren’t supplied for every country. In some countries a local partner has written their own localisation. When planning a roll out it is important to understand the legal requirements for each country and to consider involving an in-country partner to assist with the configuration of the localisations required.
 

10. Project management.

A roll out can
be a complex project consisting of several phases. The work undertaken can be carried out in disparate places, sometimes across the globe. It is important that a good project plan is put in place that takes into account many of the points already raised within this article – localisations, security, language, culture and, of course, the required functionality and any associated development activities, such as reporting.
A detailed plan must be produced showing all the required resources, both from the customer perspective and all partner company resources.

If you follow these tips then you will have made key steps in building a framework for success.